Preeclampsia in my First Pregnancy

My struggle with bipolar disorder
September 5, 2019

Preeclampsia in my First Pregnancy

Did you have any unusual symptoms before you got your diagnosis? Share to Show your Support!

When I was 25, I got pregnant with my first child. I expected an easy pregnancy, but that is not what I got! I had a lot of morning sickness early on and lost quite a bit of weight. During my third trimester, I was so worn out that I had difficulty going up a flight of stairs. For someone who had previously been very athletic, this was very hard.

Read more: Pain for a Beautiful Baby

My midwives finally noticed that something was going on when my entire arm bruised when I had a routine blood draw. It turns out that my white blood cell count had been dropping during my whole pregnancy and they never mentioned it to me! My water broke at 35 weeks and I delivered a 5 lb 5oz baby boy. He had some trouble feeding at first, but he is now a happy and healthy four-year-old.

Read more: Raising up to the challenge

I had my daughter (my second child) and this pregnancy was like night and day compared to my first. I felt pretty good, even more energetic than usual, throughout. Due to my history of preterm labor, I saw the high-risk specialist for all of my appointments. They were wonderful and kept a very close eye on me. I delivered my daughter at 37 weeks and 8lbs, and was so happy to have a healthy birth!

Did you have any unusual symptoms before you got your diagnosis? Share to Show your Support!

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  1. Avatar Ramon says:

    California researchers who studied preeclampsia deaths over several years found one striking theme : “Despite triggers that clearly indicated a serious deterioration in the patient’s condition, health care providers failed to recognize and respond to these signs in a timely manner, leading to delays in diagnosis and treatment.” Preeclampsia symptoms — swelling and rapid weight gain, gastric discomfort and vomiting, headache and anxiety — are often mistaken for the normal irritations that crop up during pregnancy or after giving birth. “We don’t have a yes-no test for it,” said Eleni Tsigas, executive director of the Preeclampsia Foundation. “A lot of physicians don’t necessarily see a lot of it.” Outdated notions — for example, that delivering the baby cures the condition — unfamiliarity with best practices and lack of crisis preparation can further hinder the response.

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